Technical Assistance Services Workshops

The Northwest Mountain MSDC hosted a series of free online workshops for businesses interested in doing business with the City of Seattle as part of the Technical Assistance Services program. This series included insight from industry experts and open discussions on a number of topics. Missed these workshops? Click on the attachments below to review any or all of the presentations. This series will be repeated in the summer, so let Zavere Weeks, Program Assistant, know if you are interested in registering!
  1. How to register to do business with the City of Seattle? Firms learned how to properly register with the City of Seattle’s Online Business Directory. All firms seeking to do business with the City of Seattle must be registered as a Supplier. Registering here places your firm into a directory utilized by City of Seattle departments when searching for businesses to fulfill work orders. Firms engaged in the process of developing a capabilities statement. To learn more: TAS Workshop 1
  2. How to research the City of Seattle opportunities and contracts? Firms learned how to search and find City of Seattle solicitations and reviewed effective searching practices. After finding solicitations participants learned how to evaluate whether or not a particular solicitation is right for them (make go/no-go decisions). This training discussed choosing the opportunity that appropriately fits your business. To learn more: TAS Workshop 2
  3. How to read and respond to a City of Seattle Request for Proposal? In this workshop, firms gained an  understanding of how to properly respond to the City of Seattle’s Request for Information, Request for Quote and Request for Proposal. Knowing how to respond and with what information, will help to gain further consideration from the City. To learn more: TAS Workshop 3
  4. How to design and develop your marketing collateral? Learn how to develop a complete marketing strategy to prepare your business to successfully engage with the City of Seattle for potential business opportunities. In this workshop, firms discussed creating marketing with purpose! To learn more: TAS Workshop 4
  5. What are the back office responsibilities you are accountable for? In this workshop, participants learned how to interpret the terms and conditions of a contract and translate that into actionables. This helps to create deliverable timelines to better manage back office  responsibilities and comply with contract terms and conditions. To learn more: TAS Workshop 5
  6. Now that you have the business, how do you finance it for growth? In this final workshop, firms dove into a discussion around growing your business smart. Participants learned from subject matter experts in the following fields: Finance, Accounting Budgeting and Tax Planning.  They also reviewed tips on how to best use and manage credit. To learn more: TAS Workshop 6

TAS Presentation at NAMCWA

Fernando Martinez, President and CEO of the Council, presented at the Washington Chapter of National Association of Minority Contractors on March 5, 2020 in Tukwila. He presented on the Technical Assistance Services program. To view the presentation, click here.

For more information on the Technical Assistance Services program, visit www.nwmmsdc.org/tas-seattle

Press Release- City of Seattle and Northwest Mountain MSDC: Partnership to Deliver Technical Assistance Services

SEATTLE, WA — The City of Seattle and Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council (Northwest Mountain MSDC) have partnered in the development and launch of the City of Seattle’s Technical Assistance Services program. Over the next twelve months, Northwest Mountain MSDC will provide recruitment outreach and business technical assistance for engagement, growth, and expansion of their services with the City of Seattle.

Fernando Martinez, President of the Northwest Mountain MSDC states, “We are very pleased to partner with the City of Seattle and offer our expertise to help these firms increase their probability of engaging and increasing their business with the City.”

To support Historically Underutilized Businesses/Women & Minority Business Enterprises (HUB/WMBE) and other firms in the development of their capabilities thereby making them more competitive, Northwest Mountain MSDC will offer business technical assistance in the following areas: Understanding How to do Business with the City of Seattle; Business Assessment; How to Effectively Respond to RFXs; Marketing Your Firm; Negotiating and Contracting; Understanding the Numerous Contracts Available to do Business; Executive Education; and Access to Capital. City of Seattle staff members and key partners—Craft3, TRIO Group, and the University of Washington’s Consulting and Business Development Center—will participate in the delivery of program services. Services will be offered in both a group setting as well as through customized, one-on-one sessions.

“We look forward to supporting the City of Seattle in building a more robust pipeline and increasing their spend with HUB/WMBEs and any firm interested in doing business with the City of Seattle. Similarly, we look forward to measuring HUB/WMBE and participating firms’ growth over the next 12 months as a result of the Technical Assistance provided,” says Fernando.

About the Council:
Founded in 1978, the Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to drive economic value by equalizing opportunities. As an affiliate of the National MSDC, the Council certifies minority-owned businesses and provides access to supplier development, supply chain inclusion, networking events, and formal introductions. The Council serves the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

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If you would like more information about this topic, please call Karla Malacon, Manager of Marketing and Communications, at (253) 243-6964 or email kmalacon@nwmmsdc.org.

Click here for a pdf of this press release.

UW Students Present “Supplier Diversity Toolkit” at the 2019 Annual Conference

University of Washington students, Lukas Garcia, Jaclyn Hill, Wenqi Huang, Ashlyn Reid and Sy Ruiz of the Supplier Diversity Program conducted research on building a Supplier Diversity Toolkit. With guidance from Michael Verchot, Director of the UW Consulting and Business Development Center and Fernando Martinez, CEO of the Northwest Mountain MSDC, they had the opportunity to share their findings at our 2019 Annual Conference hosted on June 19, 2019.

View Supplier Diversity Toolkit Presentation Here

FB Live Stream Here

Interested in Building Out A Supplier Diversity Process for your business? Lukas Garcia, Jaclyn Hill, Wenqi Huang, Ashlyn Reid and Sy Ruiz walk you through a more detailed approach at what it takes to get started. Click Here to read more.

Tri-Council Minority Business Mega Summit

The Tri-Council Minority Business Mega Summit, was a one-day business conference hosted in collaboration with the Western Regional Council and the Pacific Southwest Council. Together, council presidents Fernando Martinez, Cecil Plummer and Rainey Alben successfully hosted a full day of development, networking and connecting with MBEs and NMSDC Members from three regions on February 28, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

We hope you enjoy the photos from this event!

See more photos in our event archive.

 

Northwest Mountain MSDC Hits Four Decades of MBE Supply-Chain Inclusion

Volume II 2018
By Genny Hom-Franzen

Fernando Martinez believes corporations that have not embraced supplier diversity are missing the mark. “They are not creating value for their stakeholders / shareholders by continuing to take the easy way out and remaining status quo,” he said. “They are alienating the consumer market. The market always reaches equilibrium. The prudent consumers align themselves to organizations that share their values. Failure to be inclusive in a meaningful way — as the market becomes more diverse — is a sure way to lose market share, customers and revenue.”

Martinez should know. For almost 10 years, he has served as president and CEO of the Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. “Being able to serve our region for 40 years is our biggest success. Our council’s longevity has established us as an institution within a region where MBEs [minority business enterprises] are truly the minority,” he said, referring to the Northwest Mountain region where ethnic minorities make up less than 25 percent of the population.

“The founding model of our organization — MBE inclusion within the supply chain, launched by The Boeing Co. — continues to exist today, but not without challenges,” Martinez said. “In the state of Washington, for example, legislations such as Initiative 200 are being misquoted to the detriment of minority-owned businesses. Given today’s economic environment, it is crucial that we innovate and build on the MBE inclusion model.

“While inclusion is our core focus, developing and growing MBEs remains as relevant as it was 40 years ago,” he continued. “At the end of the day, it’s about helping our members and MBE companies grow their businesses year over year, drive wealth into our communities, economically impact our region, create generational wealth and make our region a better place to live.”

While supplier diversity has helped minority-owned businesses grow and develop over the last 40 to 50 years, Martinez believes that currently, supplier diversity is being deprioritized. He said funding is dwindling, supplier diversity staffs are shrinking, supplier diversity practices are being absorbed into other departments as an adjunct role and — in some cases — supplier diversity is being completely shut down.

BRINGING PARITY TO SUPPLY CHAIN

“We must stave off this trend,” he said. “We must factually articulate the value a strong supplier diversity process delivers to the organization and its customers. Our advocacy/education must link supply-chain value to the customer-value chain.” To that end and to resolve these biases, Martinez is making education a top priority initiative at the council. He and his staff have provided MBE and member development training, including minority executive education, supplier diversity training for leadership and procurement teams, programs for innovators and industry experts and programs to connect business leaders who share the same values.

“Education and validation can silence some of the biases,” he said.
“Our goal is to support diversifying the workforce. By bringing parity to the supply chain and having an inclusive and diverse workforce, our council will have a much bigger impact on our communities,” Martinez said. “Parity will drive better community wages, better health care, better education, an increased tax base and, thus, empowered and vibrant communities. Once established, parity will gain momentum, self-perpetuate, build diverse companies and protect our communities of color from gentrification.”

Ultimately, via all its educational and development programs, initiatives and events, he said the council’s goal is to bring parity between the supply chains they support and the community demographic makeup.

In addition to the council’s ongoing educational programs, it will be celebrating with a 40th anniversary breakfast. Corporate and public agency members, MBEs, other partner organizations and friends will be gathering Oct. 10, 2018, at the Hilton Bellevue in Bellevue, Washington. The event will pay tribute and thanks to the council’s founding organization, Boeing. The council will present Legacy Awards to honor corporations, public agencies and MBEs that have been with the council for 10 years or more.

With 40 years of success to stand on, Martinez and his staff are poised for the future. “Thank you to all the corporate/public agency members and MBEs who have come before us,” he said. “We stand on your shoulders and dedicate ourselves to the continuous growth of our members, MBEs and community. We are committed to supporting the growth of our corporate/public agency members and MBEs — it is the path to keeping our diverse communities alive, growing and sustainable.”

For full article visit: Minority Business News USA