Public and Private Sector Join Forces to Expand Vaccine Access

Summary

King County, with the support of Boeing, has moved its Auburn vaccination site to the Outlet Collection in Auburn as of March 29 to expand vaccine access.

Story

King County has relocated its Auburn community vaccination site from the General Services Administration Complex to the Outlet Collection shopping center in Auburn, in large part due to a partnership with Boeing, which has contributed to the clinic’s infrastructure. The larger facility will allow for six times the appointment capacity of the previous site.

Expanding vaccine access in south King County

Vaccination efforts have shown tremendous progress in King County. Both the Auburn and Kent vaccination sites have contributed to the larger, county-wide effort of administering over 960,000 doses to date, as well as closing the equity gap for those who have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.

This relocation and vaccine access expansion come at a critical moment. Vaccine eligibility is increasing across Washington, and as of March 31, approximately 1.2 million King County residents will be eligible under the existing and expanding criteria. Continued partnership between County government, the City of Auburn, and partners like Boeing facilitate the infrastructure needed to support ongoing vaccination efforts once supply meets demand.

Our expanded capacity at our Auburn clinic will help us get more vaccine to the communities hardest hit by the outbreak, and help us all stay healthy,” said Executive Constantine. “Working together with our community partners, King County is ready to get everyone vaccinated once supply allows.”

“King County has been relentless in their efforts to provide south King County with COVID-19 resources to fight this virus,” said Auburn Mayor Nancy Backus. “I cannot be more proud of our business partners at the Outlet Collection and the Boeing Company for stepping in to help make this strategic move. I also want to extend my deepest appreciation to our local firefighters from the Valley Regional Fire Authority and the Puget Sound Fire Authority who have been working alongside us from the beginning to administer vaccines and care for us. I urge all residents of Auburn to utilize this vaccination site when you become eligible so we can bring this virus under control.”

“The Health Department has recommended moving the site to the Auburn Outlet Collection in order to accommodate as many people as possible”, said King County Councilmember Pete von Reichbauer. “Their decision is data-driven and supports the finding that access to vaccinations is critical if we are going to defeat this virus.”

“Boeing is honored to support Public Health – Seattle & King County in opening a new mass vaccination clinic in Auburn,” said Auburn Site Leader Melissa Fleener. “Our neighbors in south King County have been impacted by the pandemic to a higher degree than many of the surrounding communities, and we are pleased to be able to provide assistance where it is most needed.”

“We know vaccination is one of the most critical tools we have to slow the pandemic down,” said Patty Hayes, Director of Public Health – Seattle & King County. “We will continue to work diligently with our community partners at this new Auburn site to ensure we reach even more south King County residents as access and eligibility expand.”

The Auburn Outlet Collection site also offers several other benefits to community members as they prepare for vaccination, including:

  • Easier access by transit – the site is located directly on several major bus lines and can be reached by a direct bus service from Auburn Station.
  • Accessible to those without a vehicle – the previous drive-through only site required access to a vehicle. The new facility is ADA accessible, and mobility assistance from trained staff is available on site to help patients if needed.
  • Indoor operations – the new site is entirely indoors, which prevents weather-related disruptions and creates a safer environment for all during the vaccine administration process.

The current drive-through COVID-19 testing site at the General Services Administration Complex in Auburn will continue to operate. More information on how to secure testing appointments is available at Public Health’s website, COVID-19 Testing Locations.

Registration information

Beginning Tuesday, March 30, eligible residents can register for an appointment at Public Health’s vaccine website, Getting Vaccinated in King County.

Currently, registration is only open to vaccine-eligible residents of south King County. You must have an appointment, so please do not show up directly to the site without an appointment.

Assistance registering by phone: Call Washington state’s COVID-19 Assistance Hotline at 1-800-525-0127, then press # for help with registration by phone. For language interpretation state your preferred language when you are connected.

Location information

Source: ht/depts/health/news/2021/March/29-vaccination.aspxtps://www.kingcounty.gov

Fernando Martinez Defines the 7 Attributes of True Leadership

“Leadership is the ability to motivate and lead individuals, teams, and organizations through discovery, discussion, and actions they would not have arrived upon on their own.”

It took a lifetime of work, research, experimentation, and refining before I arrived at my definition of leadership.  To become a great leader, more importantly a visionary-leader requires a significant deal of work and conscious effort. I had to be very intentional in my search for understanding what a great leader does, why a great leader seeks this role, and ultimately understand how to become a visionary.

1st attribute of Leadership – Desire:  I consciously committed myself to become a great leader.  It takes time, effort and risk.

2nd attribute of Leadership – Be a Teacher:  I have enough confidence in myself to be willing to share all my learning’s from my work, education, and experience.

3rd attribute of Leadership – Challenge:  I have been willing to lean forward into risk throughout my career and being a provocative thinker: consistently asking the question “So What?” – not to be difficult but to encourage thoughtfulness and deep level 2nd and 3rd level thinking (i.e., critical thinking).

4th attribute of Leadership – Courage:  Intelligently face challenges.  It takes courage to lead into the fray day-after-day, defining accountability, holding people accountable, and putting the right people in the right seats.

5th attribute of Leadership – Team Builder:  Respect for everyone is the foundation of building a team: Respect for themselves; their teammates, and, for the organization.  Respect for the leader that sets the course and helps them understand how to get there.

6th attribute of Leadership – Collaborator:  Very early in my career I found that all the good leaders pull all the appropriate resources/stakeholders together and help them achieve a common goal.

7th attribute of Leadership – Communicator:  Without the appropriate level of communication the other characteristics of leadership are of no value.  A good leader communicates, communicates, communicates!

Lastly, as these seven attributes build upon each other and become an innate skill, we achieve the pinnacle of leadership – Insightfulness – Visionary:  Through my years of experience I feel I have moved from being a first line employee to becoming a Visionary – a state of “Enlightened Competence.”  This is a state true leaders desire to achieve.  It is the state where we see things no one else sees as well as gaps, solutions, opportunities, and improved methodologies that no one else sees. This is the highest state of Leadership we can achieve – become a Visionary, become a Great Leader!

Download – Fernando Martinez Defines the 7 Attributes of True Leadership

Northwest Mountain and Fernando Martinez: Helping Small Businesses Dream Big

March 10, 2021 | Port of Seattle

The Northwest Mountain Minority Suppliers Development Council (NWMMSDC) is a national organization that links government agencies, corporations, and private sector prime contractors with certified minority-owned businesses (MBE’s) wanting to do business. NWMMSDC is a 501c3 with two-tier participation. The Northwest chapter includes Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Utah. Shepherding the organization for the last eight years is president and CEO, Fernando Martinez. Fernando says the council’s purpose is laser-focused to create equity between qualified minority businesses and Fortune 500 corporations, regional corporations, and public agencies like the Port of Seattle.

Q: Who should join the Northwest Mountain Minority Suppliers Development Council?

A: From a corporate perspective, entities that believe in diversity workforce, marketing, and supply chain. From the minority business perspective, companies that want to be on a grander scale and wish to grow. 

Q: What is NWMMSDC’s relationship with the Port of Seattle? 

A: The council has had a relationship with the Port of Seattle for over thirty years. We support the Diversity in Contracting team members. We provide them with a list of competent WMBE’s with a proven history to meet the contracting needs of the Port.  

This past summer, I was invited to speak and I talked about our pillars. Our organization has four key pillars. The first is the certification process, a robust approach to certify minority businesses. The second is development. That’s where we (with our partners) work with MBEs to help them understand their gaps and their strengths. We also assist them in building capacity for their organization. The next pillar is networking. That pillar matches competent businesses with opportunities at the Port of Seattle.  

We hold events and offer one-on-one meetings and personal introductions. It’s relationship building. The last piece is advocacy. This is where we work to educate our MBEs, our corporate and public agencies, and, in some cases, legislators about supplier diversity. We want to educate everybody on the value of supplier diversity and the value of being inclusive. 

Q: What advice do you have for small and WMBE businesses?

A: Dream big and let people help you with your dream. Don’t assume you know everything, that you don’t need any help, or can do everything yourself. Be willing to let others help and support you with your dream. Open yourself up to exposure and vulnerabilities because that will make you stronger, and it will put you in a better position to do business with organizations like the Port. 

Q: What expectation does the council have for its businesses?

A: We hold them accountable for who they are and what they want to be. We point out that pitfalls and help them change their strategies. The best thing we can be is honest and truthful with them and not give them veiled statements. 

Q: What should businesses do now in these uncertain times?

A: Small MBEs should take advantage of everything the government offers, including paycheck protection, and emergency disaster loans. Firms need to understand business sustainability, be willing to engage and network with others, and able to expand their businesses since 25 to 30 percent won’t come out of this pandemic. Businesses should look at how they can grow and absorb those that won’t make it. 

Q: What are some of the council goals for the future?

A: We are committed to leaning in. We don’t just think about the business. We think about the people the firms employ and help them grow to pay their employees better wages. The employees can then provide food and shelter, and their kids can go to school with full tummies and focus on learning. Our council’s utmost agenda is your great-grandchild. I want to help you grow, so you leave something for your great-grandchild. If we do this, we will have generational wealth, and we will have economic and political strength. We can truly change the dynamics of racism in this country.

https://www.portseattle.org/blog/northwest-mountain-and-fernando-martinez-helping-small-businesses-dream-big

Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council Stands Firmly in Support of our Asian American Pacific Islander Community

The Northwest Mountain MSDC stands strongly in support of the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Community and against all forms of hate, racism, and violence. We condemn current and past acts of anti-Asian violence and support the civil rights of AAPI community.  This hate, racism, and violence, deeply rooted in personal and institutional beliefs, has no place in our society. We, at the Northwest Mountain MSDC, are committed to the eradication of such hateful, violent, and destructive behaviors.

The attacks in Seattle, Atlanta, and across the country against our AAPI Community has no place in a civilized society. Attacks have escalated over the last year. Hate crimes against our AAPI Community increased 149% in 2019, while overall hate crimes in the U.S. declined. Other sources, that do not necessarily report crimes to the Police Department, indicate crimes against the Asian American Pacific Islander Community ranged between 3,800 and 4,800 incidents. Most of these hate crimes, 68%, were committed against women.  The trend continues. In 2021 there have already been over 500 reported hate crimes against members of the AAPI Community.  Hate crimes will continue to increase in numbers, simply because individuals think they can commit acts of violence against innocent people based on their race, ethnicity, and gender without fear of repercussions from our legal institutions.

The Council vehemently opposes these acts of hate, racism, and violence. We must stand together as a community to #StopAsianHate and stop all hate, racism, and violence.

About the Council

Founded in 1978, the Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to drive economic value by equalizing opportunities.  As an affiliate of the National MSDC, the Council certifies minority owned businesses and provides access to supplier development, supply chain inclusion, networking events and formal introductions. The Council serves the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

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Download Press Release

2021 Leadership & Advocacy Awards

NORTHWEST MOUNTAIN MSDC RECOGNIZES EXCELLENCE IN PERFORMANCE FOR 2020

The Northwest Mountain MSDC recognizes excellence in performance annually. Yesterday, we celebrated outstanding corporate and individual supplier diversity leadership and advocacy achievements in 2020, a year full of challenges for all businesses. Congratulations to all Award Winners! Read more here.

To view the presentation, click here: 2021 Leadership and Advocacy Awards by Fernando Martinez.

Thank you for your contributions to the MBE Scholarship Fund! 

                 

 

 

 

 

Covid-19 2020 Impact by Fernando Martinez

President and CEO of the Northwest Mountain MSDC, Fernando Martinez, shares information regarding the impact of Covid-19 on Minority Business Enterprises and Corporate/Public Agency Members in 2020.

 

COVID-19 2020 Impact Presentation

Northwest Mountain MSDC Recognizes Excellence In Performance For 2020

NORTHWEST MOUNTAIN MSDC RECOGNIZES EXCELLENCE IN PERFORMANCE FOR 2020

The Northwest Mountain MSDC recognizes excellence in performance annually. This year,  we celebrate outstanding corporate and individual supplier diversity leadership and advocacy achievements in 2020, a year full of challenges for all businesses. On Thursday, March 18, 2021, the Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council (Northwest Mountain MSDC) will be recognizing organizations and individuals that excel at advocating, promoting, and contracting with Minority Business Enterprises. The 2020 Award Winners are:

Advocacy Awards: Presented to individuals who exemplify an unselfish commitment to Minority Business Enterprise Development.

Recipient of the John A. Gilmore Award: Dicran Arnold, World Wide Technology, Inc.

Recipient of the Robert L. Ryan Award: Tim Otani, MUFG Union Bank, N.A.

Leadership Awards:  Presented to Minority Business Enterprises that deliver excellence in performance and value to private or public sector customers.

Class 1 Supplier of the Year – Annual Revenues up to $1M dollars: Mike Nakamura Photography LLC

Class 2 Supplier of the Year – Annual Revenues between $1M – $10M dollars: RLA Engineering LLC

Class 3 Supplier of the Year – Annual Revenues between $10M – $50M dollars: ServiceMaster of Swan Island

Class 4 Supplier of the Year – Annual Revenues above $50M: Rose International, Inc.

Leadership Awards: Presented to the Public Agency and Private Sector Corporations that commit and live the practice of Minority Business Enterprise inclusion.

Public Agency of the Year: Port of Seattle

Regional Corporation of the Year: Skanska USA Building Inc.

National Corporation of the Year: Intel Corporation

Congratulations to all our Award Winners!

About the Council

Founded in 1978, the Northwest Mountain Minority Supplier Development Council is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to drive economic value by equalizing opportunities.  As an affiliate of the National MSDC, the Council certifies minority owned businesses and provides access to supplier development, supply chain inclusion, networking events and formal introductions. The Council serves the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

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“You Know It When You See It” by Fernando Martinez

“White Privilege, You Know It When You See It.”

by

Fernando Martinez

February 5, 2021

For those of you who have never known, never wanted to know, never wanted to acknowledge its existence, or do not understand what white privilege is, now you have seen it! The attack on our country’s capital by insurrectionists without fear of reprisals was an attack on the existence of our democracy by white people who believe themselves to be better than everyone else.

Justice Stewart Potter famously used the colloquial expression, “I know it when I see it” in his 1964 concurring opinion in Jacobellis v. Ohio, as he described obscenity. How fitting is it that the obscenity of insurrection and white privilege that marred our country on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, showed everyone in this country what white privilege truly is. It is the self‐aggrandizing belief and unfettered demonstration that, “I am white and can do what I want to do, wherever I want to do it,” without fear of repercussions. Conversely, had 30,000 people of color shown up and stormed the capital, there would have been significantly more injuries, arrests, and deaths among the demonstrators.

How do I know what white privilege is? I have seen it and experienced it. It is the look white principals and secretaries gave me when they stood in front of me, blocking the entrance into the school, staring at me in disbelief that I, as a Mexican American, had the audacity to want to attend the closest school to my home. Which by the way, was only for white people! That glaring wide‐eyed look has been etched in my mind since August 1959. It is that look I saw at the age of six that I will never forget. I saw the same look later in life in an institution of higher learning. It is the vile hatred with which white people came into my neighborhood, armed with bats, “ready to kill Mexicans.” It is the young, white kid that has been raised to disrespect anyone that does not look like him/her and gets in front of me while in line because they are taught at home that people of color are less than them. It is the spite with which white people look and speak to me, as they spit on me. It is the profiling and stops I consistently get from the Border Patrol and Police Officers because of the color or length of my hair. It is the warning to assimilate myself to the white culture because my hair and goatee do not fit the professional profile. It is the tone of voice with which I am spoken to and the disrespectful behaviors I experience in Corporate America. It is the promotions I am passed over in favor of other white, less experienced individuals in Corporate America. It is the privileged dealings that take place amongst white individuals removing all opportunities for people of color to succeed. It is the backlash I know I must tolerate when I promote and defend employees of color against disrespectful and prejudicial behaviors.

White privilege transcends all economic and educational strata. It rears its ugly head amongst the rich and poor, educated and not so educated. It knows no limitations other than, white means you are better than everyone else. This is what white privilege looks like, through my eyes.

I must also say that not all white people are as such. I personally cannot paint every white person with the same brush. If it were not for a friend and his family who was white, my life and career would not be what it is today. My Corporate America mentors were primarily white and Mexican American. I grew professionally because of them. My family has benefited from the resources and teachings I received from them. The privilege they brought with them, the purity of their intentions, the purity of their willingness to share knowledge with someone that does not look like them but has a value system that mirrored their own was for the betterment of everyone around them. As I think of these individuals, I think of people who respect others without parameters, behave and act with character and integrity, and try to improve the lives of other people because they believe in equity, equality, fairness, and justice for everyone. These individuals live and think beyond their ethnocentric selves. They leverage their platform to benefit others.

I have seen this privilege from white people at its worst, with my very own eyes. It has been difficult to observe and tolerate. I have also seen it at its best, where color had nothing to do with building friendships or collegial relationships. Respect sat at the core of their intentions. So, as difficult as it has been for me to see white privilege from every aspect of my life, it would be wrong of me to say all white people behave in a privileged manner.

What we and the rest of the world saw on January 6, 2021 was white privilege at its worst. These 30,000 white privileged individuals attacked the sovereignty of the majority vote and the 2020 presidential election. They intentionally broke the law, injured people, killed five individuals, traumatized others, placed people in fear of their lives and tried to destroy our democratic institution. It was clear to me that these 30,000 white privileged men and women had the same spite and hate I have seen all my life. Their self‐aggrandizing behaviors and actions, which I have seen all my life, just got bolder. More importantly and most concerning of all is that these men and women were sent to our country’s capital representing millions of other white privileged individuals.

As a person of color I have experienced many things throughout my life and continue to experience those things today. In each instance I chose to move through all hateful behaviors simply based on the color of my skin. As I have processed what occurred on January 6, 2021, I realize the only good thing coming out of this insurrection is that the federal government now has to be transparent. The outcomes, arrests, and convictions will tell us if our democratic institution is truly founded on equality, fairness, and justice or if our democratic institution actively and consciously suppresses growth and advancement of our people and communities of color.

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Click on the link below for an article written by Fernando Martinez.

You Know It When you See It